The Value of Customer Support

The Value of Customer Support  

I want to go on a little bit of a rant. I’ve had the worst customer support experience with an online marketer and I thought I would share with you some insight.

First, we all realize, at least intellectually, that customer support is imperative to your business. You know that an unhappy customer can cause all kinds of grief. You don’t know if that person you are ticking off is an influential Facebook celebrity who will then plaster your business all over their page with extremely negative reviews/comments   customer support and messaging software   . You say “that’s free advertisement!”. True, that may lead to increased traffic to you site, but they won’t buy anything. In fact, they could troll your site, eating up bandwidth, posting rude or obnoxious comments. Your reputation is tainted after a battle like that. You can’t win. There are other hazards to ticking off your customers as well, but I think you get the picture.

However, we also know there is always that pesky, pain in the butt customer who expects you to bend over backwards for the smallest thing. Especially one that didn’t purchase anything, only downloaded a free report. Not only that, but they will be asking for things regarding a product that you really don’t want to support any longer.

My answer to this is: Suck it up.

If you sell a product to a customer, you support them. Period. Understand it is within reason. But selling a product you have no intentions of supporting or maintaining is just bad business practice. You don’t please anyone. If you don’t want to support the product, take it off your site and stop promoting it! This goes for the bonuses you provide. Even if they aren’t your own. If you’ve partnered with someone and they provided bonuses that you put on your product sales, thank you, or bonus page then you are responsible to the customer for making sure they get what you promised.

Customer Support Gone Wrong

Let me give you an example of how this communication plays out.

I purchased a product from an online vendor at a price point of $17. The upsell to the Pro version as well for $37 and an addon package for $27. A pretty good customer, right? You’d at least want to keep me on your buyer’s list. The purchase included a nice array of bonuses, some from the vendor and some from others. This was a factor in purchasing this product. So, I go to get my download link from JVZoo, go to the vendor’s website, download my product and then try to download the bonuses. The first bonus which is a good fit for the product I bought were components that could be used inside the vendor’s product. It was a nice bonus! I clicked on the link and ended up on a page with sparse text, broken picture links and obvious advertisements from my vendor. I figured I should tell them something is wrong. This was a recent product rollout and I’m sure they want to get this fixed. Plus, I want that bonus! So here’s a brief summary of the communication exchange.

ME: “Hello! Just wanted to let you know that the bonus page for **** from ********* is not working. The page comes up with broken links and no text. Please let me know when I can go download it. Many thanks.”

THEM:“Hey, Thanks for your email. The bonus is offered by an affiliate, not directly by us. Hence you will have to contact the affiliate for more information… Have an awesome wealth building day!”

ME:“Really? I would think that as part of your customer support, and because YOU offered the link on YOUR SITE and YOUR PRODUCT PROMOTION, you would make this right rather than pushing it off on the customer because you can’t be bothered with support.”

Next Day:

THEM: “Our apologies for the misunderstanding. I have asked our team to check with the ***** team on the problematic page. Keep you posted.”

Alright. So far so good. I might actually have a chance of getting this awesome bonus. Think again.

THEM:“According to ****, the guys at **** are having some issues with S3. He has alerted them and it should be fixed soon.”

I periodically check the download page. Still broken. <tick tock>

Five days later:

THEM: “Our records indicate that you had an open support ticket with **** Support still waiting for your reply. Since you have not replied to this ticket in 5 days, we are going to assume that your ticket was resolved and we’ll go ahead and close it… “

Oops. I didn’t think this required me to respond while they are trying to fix a problem and promised to keep me posted.

ME: “I haven’t replied because I wasn’t informed the problem was fixed.”

THEM: “As mentioned on March 19th, the people at ***** have been notified. They are currently having issues with S3. Unfortunately it is something that is beyond our control.”

Ugh, I’m so tired of this.

So, what does this communication tell us?

The customer, who purchased your entire funnel, is unhappy with the bonus availability.

The “support team” didn’t seem particularly invested in getting the problem fixed, nor ensuring customer satisfaction. It is probably an outsourced support desk and possibly the product vendor was never notified. From the customers’ standpoint, your support team is you.

The customer feels you do not care about him or the fact he spent so much money on your products. He will likely never buy from you again and may very well post your support issues on the web for everyone to read.

About the Author

admin

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *